Georgia state quick facts
    Georgia Facts
    State of Georgia
    Nickname Peach State
    Capital Atlanta
    Largest city Atlanta
    Population 10.3M (Rank:8)

    Georgia facts


    How did Georgia get its name?
    The state of Georgia was named after King George II of Great Britain

    Facts about Georgia state

    Why Georgia is called 'The Peach State'?
    Georgia used to be the largest producer of Peaches and hence earned its nichname, 'The Peach State'. Ironically, it is now the third largest producer of peaches (behind California and South Carolina) Georgia can now be called 'The Peanut State' as it is the largest producer of peanuts and pecans in the United States.

    Georgia facts

    Home to busiest airport
    Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) is the busiest passenger airport in the world. It has been the world's busiest airport by passenger traffic since 1998. It covers 4,700 acres of land and has five parallel runways.

    Facts about Georgia state


    Fifth capital
    Atlanta is the capital of Georgia. Georgia has had five capitals: Savannah (1777-1785), Augusta (1786-1789), Louisville (1789-1807), Milledgeville (1807-1867), Atlanta (1868-present)

    Georgia facts


    Counties
    Georgia has the second most counties in the United States with 159 (Texas has the most with 254)

    Georgia facts


    Felon colony
    Georgia was founded in 1732 by British Member of Parliament James Oglethorpe as a refuge for prisoners who could not pay their debts and to protect southern colonies from Spanish invasion through Florida.

    Georgia facts


    Largest original state
    Georgia is the youngest and biggest of the original thirteen colonies.

    Georgia facts


    Largest drive-in restaurant
    World’s largest drive-in restaurant, The Varsity, is in Atlanta. It is on more than two acres and can accommodate 600 cars and over 800 people inside. On a busy day, over 30,000 people visit The Varsity.

    Georgia facts



    Sculpture
    The largest bas relief sculpture in the world, the Confederate Memorial Carving on the north face of Gerogia's Stone Mountain, depicts three Confederate leaders of the Civil War, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. The entire carved surface measures 3 acres

    Georgia facts


    University of Georgia
    Georgia became the first state in the United States to charter a state-supported university on January 27, 1785 when the University of Georgia was incorporated by an act of the General Assembly. (The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill is the oldest state university in the United States as it became the first public institution of higher learning in the United States to admit the students in 1795. UNC was the only public institution to confer degrees in the 18th century. University of Georgia started admitting students in 1801 and its first graduation was held in 1804)

    Georgia facts


    Largest swamp
    The Okefenokee in south Georgia is the largest "blackwater" swamp in North America.

    Georgia facts


    Washington
    Washington, Georgia was the first city in the United States to be established in the name of George Washington, the first president of the United States. It was established in 1780

    Georgia state facts


    Natural forest
    Marshall Forest, on the outskirts of Rome, Georgia, is the only natural forest located within city limits of any city in the United States

    Georgia facts


    Berry big campus
    Berry College near Rome, Georgia has the largest contiguous campus in the world with an area of about 27,000 acres.

      Interesting Georgia facts


      Voting age
      In 1943, Georgia became the first state in the United States to lower its voting age in state and local elections from 21 to 18.

      Interesting facts about Georgia state


      S.S. Savannah
      The S.S. Savannah set sail from Georgia in 1819 and became the first steamship to cross the Atlantic when it landed in Liverpool 29 days later.

      Interesting Georgia facts

      Birthplace of Coca-Cola
      In 1886, Coca-Cola was sold for the first time at Jacob’s Pharmacy in Atlanta for five cents a glass. In addition to Coca-Cola, Georgia is also home to the headquarters of Chick-fil-A, CNN, Delta Airlines, the Centers for Disease Control, and Home Depot.

      Interesting facts about Georgia



      Gravestones on the runway
      Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport in Georgia is the only airport in the world to have graves in the middle of a runway. The airport's Runway 10 has two marked gravestones in it. US Federal law prohibits the moving of a grave without the permission of the next of kin. In this case, two graves of the Dotson Family, one grave dating back to 1857, were encountered during the construction of the runway. Since the next of kin could not be located, the graves were left on the runway.

      Georgia facts


      Carter Jr and MLK Jr
      James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr was the only native Georgian to become the President of the United States. Jimmy Carter and Martin Luther King, Jr., are the only two native Georgians to receive the Nobel Peace Prize

      Georgia facts


      Natural wonders
      Georgia has seven official natural wonders: Amicalola Falls, the Okefenokee Swamp, Providence Canyon, Radium Springs, Stone Mountain, Tallulah Gorge and Warm Springs.

      Georgia facts



      Gone with the Wind
      The story of Atlanta-native Margaret Mitchell’s iconic novel Gone with the Wind is set in Clayton County, Georgia, and Atlanta, Georgia. When the film adaptation of the book premiered in Atlanta, Georgia, over a million people poured into Atlanta. The Governor of Georgia declared the day of the premiere a state holiday, and the mayor of Atlanta organized three days of parades and parties.

      Georgia facts

      March to the Sea
      Georgia had more plantations than any southern state and hence slavery was an emotive issue for it. In 1864, Union General William Tecumseh Sherman invaded Georgia, captured Atlanta and burned it to ground to teach an 'unforgettable' lesson to Georgia.

      Interesting Georgia facts


      No to slavery and lawyers
      Among the original thirteen colonies, Georgia was the only colony to be governed remotely by a Board of Trustees in London. It was also the only colony to prohibit slavery, lawyers and Roman Catholics at the time of its birth.

      Interesting Georgia facts


      Vidalia onion
      The world-famous Vidalia onions are grown in and around Vidalia, Georgia. Prized by chefs around the world, they are considered to be the sweetest onions in the world. Their unusually sweet taste is due to the low amount of sulfur in the soil in which they are grown.

      Georgia state quick facts

      Nickname Peach State List
      Capital Atlanta List
      Largest city Atlanta List
      Largest metro Atlanta Metro (rank: 9) List
      Motto Wisdom, Justice, Moderation List
      Abbreviation GA List
      Population 10.3 million (rank: 8) List
      Population density 165 per mile2 (rank: 18) List
      Life expectancy 77.2 (rank: 41) List
      Median age 36.4 years (rank: 11) List
      Area 59,425 mile2 (rank: 24) List
      Median household income $50,768 (rank: 38) List
      Statehood January 2, 1788 (4th state) List
      Mean elevation 600 ft (183 m) List
      Highest point Brasstown Bald 4,784 ft (1458 m) List
      Governor Nathan Deal (R)
      Time now

    Interesting Georgia facts



    Three governors
    In 1947, a bizarre political drama unfolded in Georgia when three people claimed governorship of Georgia. When the governor-elect Eugene Talmadge died before taking oath of office, both his son (Herman Talmadge, who received most write-in votes) and Lieutenant Governor (M.E. Thompson) claimed the governorship. To make the matters worse, the outgoing governor, Ellis Arnall, refused to relinquish the office of governor as the governor-elect has died before taking oath. Herman Talmadge was then sworn in at 2 am on 15 January 1947 as governor of Georgia and changed the locks on the doors of the governor's office. When Governor Ellis Arnall returned to the Capitol on the morning of 15 January to the governor's office his keys did not work as the locks were changed. Then, Arnall took control of the information booth and claimed it as his office. A Herman Talmadge supporter dropped a firecracker into the information booth to get him out of the booth! This circus continued until Georgia Supreme Court decided that M.E. Thompson was the governor.